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Google says it won't identify women who reported sexual misconduct on 'Sh*tty Media Men' list

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Google says it doesn't plan to comply with a proposed subpoena that would ask the tech giant to hand over names, email addresses, and IP addresses of women who anonymously contributed to a Google Docs spreadsheet highlighting men in the media industry accused of sexual misconduct and other inappropriate professional behavior. 


The planned subpoena is outlined in a lawsuit filed this week by one of the accused on the Google doc, known as the Shitty Media Men list. Stephen Elliott filed the federal lawsuit against writer Moira Donegan, who came out as the document's creator earlier this year. Elliott's asking Google for the personal information of the list's anonymous contributors ostensibly so he could sue them, too. Read more...

More about Google, Privacy, Lawsuit, Me Too, and Moira Donegan
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